Poole Pottery

Since 1873, the seaside town of Poole in Dorset has been the home to the Poole Pottery, which is famed for its output of studio ware and collectable ranges. A world away from the centre of Art Deco ceramics production in the Staffordshire Potteries the pottery's Deco output in the nineteen thirties was perhaps unsurprisingly highly distinctive.

The history of the company began with the opening of an architectural pottery in the Hamworthy area and through a convoluted thread of manufacturing involving lines such as tiles and art wares, the company weathered the storm right through to the early years of the twenty-first century. There are different strands of 'Poole collecting' with those concentrating on modern output or the bright studio designs of the nineteen fifties and sixties moving back to the Art Deco period and beyond.

Jesse Carter and his 2 sons Charles and Owen established the potteries at Poole attracting eminent craftsmen and designers. Carter Stabler and Adams headed the pottery and tileworks during their prolific output of Art Deco ware working with designers including John Adams, Truda Carter, Olive Bourne, Irene Fawkes and Ruth Pavely with original designs by Owen Carter. Traditional shapes were deployed with patterns in the Art Deco style using an intelligent and artistic colour palette. And then Harold Stabler introduced wares with angular facets introduced as early as 1925. During the nineteen twenties and thirties the pottery enjoyed success in major exhibitions with the tileworks winning contracts to fit the Queen Mary and the Hoover factory.

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